Top Five Optical Illusion Artists in Recent History

Magic can exist anywhere, even in art. Throughout history, there have been a few talented artists who have possessed the capacity to create images that trick the mind and the eye. Whether it is a three dimensional illusion image, the illusion of movement or the blending of two images into one, optical illusion artwork never ceases to amaze. Listed below are the top five most popular optical illusion artists inrecent history.  

1. Julian Beever: Since the mid-1990’s, English chalk artist Julian Beever has been creating amazing sidewalk art that appears to be 3D. When viewed from the right angle, the images trick your mind into thinking it is viewing a three dimensional scene. Often, viewers can strategically position themselves in the scene and look as though they are a part of the drawing.

Figure 1 Sidewalk chalk drawing by Julian Beever.


2. 3D Joe and Max: This English artist duo also specializes in three dimensional chalk art. Just recently, 3D Joe and Max were commissioned by Reebok to complete the world’s largest and longest 3D street artwork to date (a Guinness World Record. The theme of the artwork was part of a marketing movement for Reebok’s CrossFit campaign.


Figure 2 Sidewalk chalk drawing by 3D Joe and Max.


3. M.C. Escher: This early 20th century Dutch graphic artist is known for creating mathematical images through woodcuts, lithographs and mezzotints. His work often depicts what is often called “impossible realities.” His interest in mathematics also inspired him to create several works that show dimension through interlocking shapes.


Figure 3 Magic Mirror, lithograph by M.C. Escher.


4. Sandro Del Prete: Like Escher, Del Prete creates images that could not exist in reality. However, Del Prete does not use mathematical precision in his work. Much of his art requires you to look closer, because there is often two images in one. Born in Switzerland in 1937, Del Prete began studying art and painting when he was twenty three years old at the Florence Academy of Art in Italy.


                   Figure 4 Work by Sandro Del Prete.


5. Victor Vasarely: Vasarely was a 19th century artist. Born in Budapest in 1906, he abandoned his medical studies to become a painter of op-art. His work “Zebra” is believed to be one of the earliest examples of optical illusion art, and he is believed to be an op-art pioneer.


                  Figure 5 Work by Victor Vasarely.


Carrie Oakley is editor and writer for http://www.onlinecolleges.org

Figure 2 Sidewalk chalk drawing by 3D Joe and Max.


3. M.C. Escher: This early 20th century Dutch graphic artist is known for creating mathematical images through woodcuts, lithographs and mezzotints. His work often depicts what is often called “impossible realities.” His interest in mathematics also inspired him to create several works that show dimension through interlocking shapes.


Figure 3 Magic Mirror, lithograph by M.C. Escher.

4. Sandro Del Prete: Like Escher, Del Prete creates images that could not exist in reality. However, Del Prete does not use mathematical precision in his work. Much of his art requires you to look closer, because there is often two images in one. Born in Switzerland in 1937, Del Prete began studying art and painting when he was twenty three years old at the Florence Academy of Art in Italy.



                   Figure 4 Work by Sandro Del Prete.

5. Victor Vasarely: Vasarely was a 19th century artist. Born in Budapest in 1906, he abandoned his medical studies to become a painter of op-art. His work “Zebra” is believed to be one of the earliest examples of optical illusion art, and he is believed to be an op-art pioneer.



                  Figure 5 Work by Victor Vasarely.

Carrie Oakley is editor and writer for Online Universities She likes to write articles about many topics of interest, including education and career planning.


Online Universities

She likes to write articles about many topics of interest, including education and career planning.